rac-smct-text-block

 Press Room | Facebook | Twitter | DONATE

Latest Updates

RAC's Blog

Photo: Bill Swersey/HIAS

This post is adapted from a report written for the Reform Movement's Commission on Social Action. Photo: Bill Swersey/HIAS.

We’ve all heard the news about our immigration crisis, but I recently had a chance to learn what is real and what is hyperbole. From August 21-22, I represented the Reform Movement as part of a 4-person delegation in a trip to the U.S./Mexico border.The trip, organized by HIAS and the...

Read More

A version of this post appeared in JTA

Last year, I wrote an essay urging rabbis to deliver a High Holiday sermon that was relevant to the political moment.

“I understand the typical view that it is better for rabbis to speak to higher values than to take sides in the rough-and-tumble over political issues,” I wrote. “But as we all know, this is no ordinary time.”

My...

Read More

 

On August 22, 2018, we sent a list of questions to Congress regarding the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. 

As a Movement rooted deeply in enduring Jewish values and committed to the principles of justice, equality, the rule of law and compassion, we urge members of Congress to make use of these questions during Judge Kavanaugh’s hearing, explore these issues of concern with Judge Kavanaugh if they meet with him, and...

Read More

Doors of a polling station

The High Holidays invite us to initiate both personal and communal change. During the ten Days of Awe between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, we reflect on our own choices as well as the actions of our broader community.  Most of the prayers we recite asking for forgiveness, like the Viddui and the Ashamnu, are written in the first-person plural. These prayers remind us that we are part of a community and responsible for shaping a collective future – hopefully one that advances the well-being of all its members. We are taught, “all of Israel is responsible for each other” (Shevuot 39a)....

Read More

The author and his internship supervisor pose for a photo at the RAC office.

Ask anyone about their childhood memories and they will most likely reference a happy moment. Most people do not like to recall the sad moments that take place early in life, but I like to reflect on one particular moment that encompassed both joy and sadness, impacting my perspective on life forever. I remember walking into Auschwitz and seeing the old railroad tracks into the concentration camp. Briefly, I was able to envision what it must have looked like when the camp was filled with prisoners, the guards were standing with rifles, and there was horror all around. I walked slowly...

Read More